Architects of their Own Liberation: African Americans and the Abolition Movement

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Manisha Sinha. Photo William Farrington.

In her groundbreaking book, The Slave’s Cause: A History of Abolition, Manisha Sinha, Draper Chair in American History at the University of Connecticut, Storrs, documents the centrality of slave resistance in shaping the ideology and tactics of abolition. On Monday, October 24, Sinha was joined by Pulitzer Prize, Lincoln Prize, and Bancroft Prize winner Eric Foner for a conversation on liberation and the abolition movement.

 

 

From left to right: Eric Foner, Manisha Sinha, Sid Lapidus, and Sylviane Diouf.

From left to right: Eric Foner, Manisha Sinha, Sid Lapidus, and Sylviane Diouf.

Eric Foner and Manisha Sinha. Photo William Farrington.

Eric Foner and Manisha Sinha. Photo William Farrington.

Watch the video.

 

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Manisha Sinha is professor and the James L. and Shirley A. Draper Chair in Early American History at the University of Connecticut. She received her Ph.D from Columbia University where her dissertation was nominated for the Bancroft prize. She was awarded the Chancellor’s Medal, the highest honor bestowed on faculty and received the Distinguished Graduate Mentor Award in Recognition of Outstanding Graduate Teaching and Advising from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, where she taught for over twenty years. Her recent book The Slave’s Cause has been reviewed by theWall Street Journal, The New York Times, The Christian Science Monitor, The Atlantic, and the Boston Globe, among other newspapers and journals.

 

efEric Foner is DeWitt Clinton Professor of History at Columbia University. He received his PhD from Columbia University. He has won a Pulitzer Prize and a Bancroft Prize, and his book Gateway to Freedom: The Hidden History of the Underground Railroad is the winner of the New York Historical Society’s 2016 American History Book Prize.